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Showing posts with label Women in the Age of Trump. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Women in the Age of Trump. Show all posts

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Women in the Age of Trump: SEARCH TEAM (excerpt) by Clinnesha D. Sibley

SEARCH TEAM by  Clinnesha D. Sibley is a finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

 Clinnesha on her play
As a black woman writer, my attempt is to always amplify the voices of disparate communities. During Donald Trump's time on the campaign trail, I published a series of social justice poetry. When he managed to get elected, I wrote this play to cement the moment he mocked someone with a chronic condition. I put pen to paper to illustrate how we are surrounded by Trump-like politics whether we choose to see it or not. Sometimes as a playwright, I grapple over what's more effective-- maintaining subtlety or being bold. In "Search Team", like in our day-to-day lives, there's both - subtlety and boldness.


Thanks to Clinnesha D. Sibley for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this video excerpt of her play SEARCH TEAM. And thanks to Lawryn LaCroix and Michael Rehse for their good work.
CLINNESHA D. SIBLEY is a published poet, essayist and award-winning playwright. For more information, visit: http://onepagerapp.com/clinneshadsibley.
LAWRYN LACROIX is an actor and singer based in New York City. She has performed in many shows in and around New York including Hip to Hip's TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA.
MICHAEL REHSE a graduate of Pace University with a BA in Computer Science, is a native of Redmond, Washington and a member of Cupcake Lady Productions, Co-Op Theatre East, Ophelia Theater Group, and the CAGE Collective. Recent credits include Imaginary Friends (Host, various, PCTF 2016), EverScape (Gil, NYC Fringe 2015), Easier Said Than Done (Nathan, PCTF 2015), and The Long Rail North (Sgt Maj Vickers, PCTF 2015). Other favorite credits include Comedy of Errors (Antipholus of Syracuse, NYC Fringe 2014),Things I Left on Long Island (Stephen, NYC Fringe 2014), Two Gentlemen of Verona: A Swashbuckling Comedy (Valentine, NYC Fringe 2013), The Importance of Being Earnest (Algernon), Hamlet (Hamlet), Measure 4 Measure (Claudio), and The Cast Party: A Survival Story (Owen Merrick). He collaborated in writing and performing What to Do In Case You Miss The Rapture, and was seen on the Biography Channel reenacting Patrick Muldoon's story in Celebrity Ghost Stories. All the much, so the many.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Women in the Age of Trump: STAY WOKE (excerpt) by Chloé Duvant

STAY WOKE by  Chloé Duvant is a finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

 Chloé Duvant on her play:
This was written a day after Donald Trump was elected president, where I was trying to figure out what my purpose was within this world, despite the fact I no longer felt welcomed here. In the end, I figured my purpose was to create art, and I should not shy away or be intimidated by what is happening in this country, or in the world; instead, I should use my art to speak on topics, and make myself heard.
Thanks to Chloé Duvant or allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this video excerpt of her play STAY WOKE. And thanks to Keona Welch for her good work.



CHLOE DUVANT is the pen name of an aspiring writer, currently residing in Los Angeles, California. She is a sophomore at the University of Southern California, majoring in Narrative Studies, with a minor in Cinematic Arts.
Web site http://chloeduvant.com
KEONA WELCH recently joining the cast of Netflix's SEVEN SECONDS. Other credits include, And Miles To Go (The Wild Project; Dir. Hal Brooks), Kunstler (Hudson Stage; Dir. Annette O'toole), Moony's Kid Don't Cry (Drama League's DirectorFest 2012; Dir. Christopher Windom), A Raisin in The Sun (Huntington Theatre Company; Dir. Liesl Tommy), Ruined (The Philadelphia Theatre Company). Film: CUSTODY;DIDN'T I ASK FOR TEA?; END OF HOPE; BIRTH REPORT; THE RIOT; CANDY. TV: "Law & Order"; "Law &Order SVU". Training: Duke Ellington School of the Arts & Rutgers University, BFA

Sunday, April 9, 2017

Women in the Age of Trump: WAIT FOR IT by Lisa Carstens

WAIT FOR IT by Lisa Carstens is a finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

Lisa Carstens on her monologue:

I saw the call for Women in the Age of Trump and wrote this monologue that night. When a playwright friend saw my name on the list of semifinalists, she asked me what my entry was about, and I said it was “a weird and only tangentially relevant monologue that askance expresses the surreal woe of moving backwards in gender equity time.” She replied that she “couldn’t imagine what to write to respond to Trump. I’m stymied, flummoxed, incapacitated by the whole thing.” That’s when I realized that my monologue was about being stymied, flummoxed, and incapacitated by the whole thing.

Thanks to Lisa Carstens for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this video of her monologue WAIT FOR IT. And thanks to Diane Quinn and Bill Fuller for their good work.




LISA CARSTENS is Dean of Arts and Sciences and Professor of English at Pacific University, Oregon. Lisa recently had a short play produced as one of seven winners in The Fusion Theatre’s annual 10-minute playwriting competition, “The Seven” (Albuquerque NM, June 2016). Prior to that, the same play, “Future Perfect,” was a finalist in the Actor’s Theatre of Louisville’s 2015 National Ten Minute Play Contest.

DIANE QUINN is a professional Actor, dancer, singer, choreographer and model who has performed in many regional theatres all over the country, aboard a cruise ship and in Japan. She has also appeared on Sex and the City as Phyllis and Law and Order as Mr. Abbot's Assistant. Some of her favorite performances include Grete in Sight Unseen, Diana in Lend Me A Tenor, Ursula in Sweet Charity and dancing the Dream/Somewhere Ballet in West Side Story. She is an alumna of Atlantic Acting School. You can next see her in Central Park at her 7th Annual Shakespeare Sonnet Slam https://www.shakespearesonnetslam.com/

BILL FULLER (camera, sound and lighting) Professional Audio Engineer and Composer with 20 years of experience. Some recent Clients include: HBO, Showtime, The Daily Show, ABC World News Tonight, 60 Minutes, Reuters, The Ad Council, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, McKinsey, PWC, J & J, Verizon, Samsung, Google, Pfizer, Bayer, Coca Cola, Quidsi, BMW and Goldman Sachs. He has a degree from Berklee College of Music in music production and engineering. He is also a singer/songwriter currently completing his next CD and is Producing a soon-to-be launched Podcast.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Women in the Age of Trump: CLINTON VERSUS TRUMP SEX ROMP GO! (excerpt) by Xavier Toby

CLINTON VERSUS TRUMP SEX ROMP GO! by Xavier Toby is a finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

Xavier Toby on his play:

I believe that most people are reasonable and good, no matter their political beliefs. They hold down jobs, raise families, and are convinced they are good humans, doing the best they can. So it's essential to me that my characters, no matter their political views, are never carictures. We're all just people trying to get by, jam-packed with good and bad, and I suppose that's what I try to write about. These are terrifying times, where too few of us know or care enough about politics, but shouting that someone is wrong, through art or a megaphone, is no way to bridge the chasm. We need to be inclusive, and my biggest worry is that society and the environment will fall apart before we've figured out how. Oh, and jokes. We always need more jokes.

Thanks to Xavier Toby for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this video of an excerpt from his play CLINTON VERSUS TRUMP SEX ROMP GO! And thanks to Larissa Adamczk and Jenna Sander for their good work.


XAVIER TOBY is a playwright, comedian and author from Australia who now resides in New York City. His work has been performed around the world, and for the last two years has been a member of the Athena Theatre Playwrights Group. http://www.athenatheatre.com | http://www.xaviertoby.com/

LARISSA ADAMCZYK is a recent graduate of the Two Year Acting Program at William Esper Studio and an alumna of Rutgers University with a Bachelor of Arts in both English & Dance. She was last seen as the suffragette, Rose, in Speranza Theatre Company's original play, Unveiling Liberty, previously as Jennifer Ann in Speranza's Millicent the Magnificent, and Heather/Daisy in their production of Women Rising. She has performed many new (and old) works with several theatre companies in the NY/NJ area, such as New Light Theater Project, Endangered Artist Sanctuary and in Household Words, a concert of original music by Martha Miller. She can be seen on the internet as Laura in her own web series, Tiny Boxes, or playing various characters throughout time in A Period Drama and Unplugged; two web series written by Casey Hartnett. Larissa is a co-founder of Halcyon Collective, a group of solo performing artists who collaborate and present inter-disciplinary performances (of the coolest kind) throughout the year. www.larissaadamczyk.com

JENNA SANDER attended the Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre. In her final graduate play she was cast in one of her favorite roles; Rosencrantz in "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead" at the Rita Morgenthau Theatre. Sander has also performed in Hedda Gabler as Thea Elvsted (Secret Theater) along with the role Lucy Hooks in Colorblind'd (Players Theater), and most recently performed as Norma Jean in "Norma Jean at The Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic" at the Hudson Guild theater.

Monday, March 13, 2017

Women in the Age of Trump: EARLY RETURNS by Ramon L. Delgado

LAURA'S EARLY RETURNS by Ramon L. Delgado is a finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

Professor Delgado on the inspiration for this monologue:

“Laura’s Early Returns” attempts to contrast past civil rights gains with possible future losses through memories of a lost, loving relationship. Three drafts over three days were needed to strike a balance between the character’s personal story and the social comment."

Thanks to Ramon L. Delgado for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this video of his monologue LAURA'S EARLY RETURNS. And thanks to Marina Re for her good work.






Retired Professor Emeritus RAMON L. DELGADO  is the author of eight published short plays, notably “Waiting for the Bus” in the Bantam Press collection Ten Great One Act Plays and the full-length play A Little Holy Water. Three of his one-acts are available from Samuel French. He was editor of The Best Short Plays series from 1981-1989 and is a member of the Dramatists Guild.

MARINA RE has appeared: Off- Broadway: Lions Theatre, NY Classical Theatre, Flea Theatre, Bleecker Street, HB Playwrights, Abingdon,Kraine. West End. Regional: Huntington, Riverside (Fl.),Two River, Florida Studio, CenterStage, Conn. Rep, Arts Center Coastal Carolina, National Theatre of Deaf (National Tour), Gulfshore Playhouse, Charles Playhouse, Vineyard Playhouse, CityStage, Lyric Stage,Foothills. Company Member: “Shear Madness”, Gloucester Stage Co., Merrimack Rep., Boston Shakespeare Co. Awards: Desert Star Award (Master Class), IRNE Award,, Sarasota Magazine:”Best Lead Actress”( Boleros for the Disenchanted),”Best Supporting Actress ”(The Miamians), Boston Globe ”Best Performance of Year”(View from the Bridge, North Shore Fish, Sisters Rosensweig,Present Laughter, Italian-American Reconciliation), Boston Phoenix “Favorite Local Actress”. FILM: Woody Allen’s IRRATIONAL MAN, Diane English’s THE WOMEN, IRIS, TALKING TO GOD, URBAN RELICS. TV: Primetime WWYD, New Amsterdam, Nurse Jackie. Web site: www.marinare.info/

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Women in the Age of Trump Finalists


NYCPlaywrights announces the finalists of the Women in the Age of Trump project:

  • CLINTON VERSUS TRUMP SEX ROMP GO! by Xavier Toby
  • LAURA'S EARLY RETURNS by Ramon L. Delgado
  • SEARCH TEAM by Clinnesha D. Sibley
  • STAY WOKE by Chloé Duvant
  • WAIT FOR IT by Lisa Carstens
Excerpts from these plays will be recorded and posted to the NYCPlaywrights web site this winter.

Thanks to everybody who participated in this project!

Women in the Age of Trump: LAURA'S EARLY RETURNS

LAURA'S EARLY RETURNS by Ramon L. Delgado is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."
Retired Professor Emeritus RAMON L. DELGADO  \is the author of eight published short plays, notably “Waiting for the Bus” in the Bantam Press collection Ten Great One Act Plays and the full-length play A Little Holy Water. Three of his one-acts are available from Samuel French. He was editor of The Best Short Plays series from 1981-1989 and is a member of the Dramatists Guild.
Thanks to Ramon L. Delgado for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from his monologue LAURA'S EARLY RETURNS.
   MEGAN 
   (Ruminating in front of a blank laptop.) 
Laura passed away on election night –– with the flickering TV blaring early returns –– early returns, before the tide reversed and left behind a salty scum. Despite her illness, Laura had toiled like a whirling dervish to elect a first woman President –– volunteering to deliver placards, spending hours on the phone encouraging the supporters, responding politely to the cursing fanatics of the deplorable persuasion, massaging her ears after the only response was the angry bang of a receiver. 
Though I shared in her presidential choice, I was not the fanatic that Laura had become. We balanced each other that way, my laid back reflections energized by her all consuming commitments. 
When we learned a few months ago that there was nothing else the doctors could do, we both pray-- . . . well, I hoped and she prayed that she’d survive long enough to see the good ole U.S. of A. join the other enlightened nations –– nations such as India, Israel, Great Britain, Argentina, Brazil, Pakistan, Germany, and even the old Russia Empire with leaders of our capable gender. For her sake, I’m glad that when she passed on, she believed that our dream had come true.

Women in the Age of Trump: THE CURFEW

THE CURFEW by Drewcella Oya Mae Davis is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

DREWCELLA OYA MAE DAVIS is a playwright from Minneapolis MN who uses the rhythms derived from hoods and ghettoes, and Santeria traditions to inspire her plays. She considers herself a blackist, a term coined by her, it is someone who focuses on the disparities that come with being black in America.

Thanks to Drewcella Oya Mae Davis for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from her play THE CURFEW.


(The stage opens to the apartment building of Amaze, AARon, Afina, and Anaya.  
Anaya is sitting on the couch she is staring out the window she stands up to reveals her stomach which is full of new life she holds her stomach and begins to pace back and forth than jumps on the couch and starts to look out the window again.  
Enter Afina the older sister of Anaya she is carrying two cups of tea she sets one on the table than makes her way to her sister. 
Anaya Jumps up to start pacing again almost hitting Afina. Afina jumps and spills some of her tea.)
   ANAYA 
I am so sorry 
   (Afina shakes her head) 
   AFINA 
Don’t worry about it.
   ANAYA 
I just don’t get it [BREATH] I don’t get them 
   AFINA 
They will be back love [BREATH] Don’t worry
   (Afina kisses Anaya on the head she helps her sit down) 
   ANAYA 
They got five minuets until the curfew Afina 
   (Anaya grabs her tea from the table takes a sip and sets it down .)
   ANAYA 
Black men have been killed for less[BREATH] Since they made him president 
   AFINA 
Whose they? 
(Anaya looks at Afina confused) 
   ANAYA 
The white man [BREATH] White women too they are the ones who voted for him. 
[BREATH] I don’t understand [BREATH] I mean white men yes but white women why would they vote for a man who says he wants to grab women by their- 
   AFINA 
Please don’t say that word. 
   (Anaya takes a breath.) 
   ANAYA 
Sorry[BREATH] Rape has basically become legal since he became president[BREATH] But what do you expect to happen when you make a man who has been accused of rape a president
   AFINA 
Anaya 
   ANAYA 
I mean most boys want to be like their president so 
   AFINA 
Anaya I don’t wanna talk about him right now[BREATH] Can’t we just talk about something else 
   ANAYA 
What else is there to talk about[BREATH] Society has gone to shit since he was elected it’s all around us [BREATH] Men raping women[BREATH] Black people getting murdered 
   (Anaya shakes her head she looks to her sister) 
   ANAYA 
I don’t know what I was thinking wanting to bring a baby into this world[BREATH] Two black babies whose skin will be as dark as their fathers 
   AFINA 
Hey don’t say that[BREATH] we will get through this and your not alone 
   ANAYA 
If A-ron don’t make it home by the curfew than I’ll be a single mother raising two boys all on my own

(Afina holds Anaya’s hand Anaya looks to her sister) 

   AFINA 
They are both gonna get here in time [BREATH] I’d be afraid if they were alone but together[BREATH] Amanze with his quick thinking and A-ron with his quick hands 
   ANAYA 
I just don’t understand this whole thing anyway [BREATH] Like who would declare a war on protesting it was peaceful 
   AFINA 
Guess old Trump got angry when he saw that black people didn’t respect him 
   ANAYA 
Black people weren’t the only ones who were protesting him becoming president [BREATH] Yet we were the only ones who had to suffer for it 
   AFINA 
At least he didn’t ship us off to working camps like he did to the immigrants[BREATH] I rather be shot dead in the street than have to go to one of those camps 
   ANAYA 
Yeah I hear you [BREATH] 
   (In her Trump voice) 
If you are gonna come into America you are gonna work like an American 
  (Afina stares at Anaya) 
   AFINA 
So has A-ron asked you 
   ANAYA 
Asked me what 
   (Afina looks at Anaya and smiles Anaya rolls her eyes) 
   ANAYA 
Not everyone wants that 
   AFINA 
You telling me you don’t think about getting married 
   (Anaya blushes) 
   ANAYA 
Sometimes but I don’t know if it’s A-ron’s thing [BREATH] Or my thing 
   AFINA 
It wasn’t Amaze’s thing either but it happened 
   ANAYA 
Amaze and AA-Ron are two different people 
   AFINA

Who come from the same people

Women in the Age of Trump: RENEGE

RENEGE by Sara Ilyse Jacobson is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

SARA ILYSE JACOBSON's plays have received staged readings and productions at the Capital Fringe Festival, Planet Connections Theatre Festivity, Kennedy Center Page-To-Stage Festival, Chameleon Theatre Circle, Shelterbelt Theatre, Source Festival, , DC SWAN Day, Life and Death Matters Festival, Flush Ink Productions' Asphalt Jungle, Modern-Day Griot Theatre Company, Ticket 2 Eternity Productions, Live Arts' Barhoppers, Abstract Sentiment Theatre Co., Last Frontier Theatre Conference, and Estrogenius Festival. Sara is the recipient of a 2010 Individual Artist Fellowship from the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities. www.sarailyse.com

Thanks to Sara Ilyse Jacobson for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from her play RENEGE.
   LUKE 
So you’re a reader. 
   VICKY 
I read. 
   ( He looks at the magazine cover)
   LUKE 
The New Yorker. Classy. 
   VICKY 
I like the cartoons. 
   LUKE 
Pretentious, yet classy. 
   (She checks to see if the bus is coming.) 
For such an attractive woman, you sure have unfortunate taste in reading material. 
   VICKY 
Excuse me? 
   LUKE 
Have you ever noticed that the buses are never on schedule when it’s overcast? It doesn’t even have to be raining; a little grey sky will do it. 
   VICKY 
Hold on. 
   LUKE 
You disagree? I’m willing to put money on it. 
   VICKY 
I know what you’re doing. 
   LUKE 
Just making conversation, that’s all. 
   VICKY 
The dig about the magazine. 
   LUKE 
It was a joke. 
   VICKY 
You’re doing that thing...
   LUKE 
I don’t know what you mean. 
   VICKY 
That pick up technique where you insult the woman you’re hitting on, and then quickly change the subject. 
   LUKE 
I was kidding. 
   VICKY 
You’re NEGGING me! 
   LUKE 
No. 
   VICKY 
Trying to make me feel insecure. 
   LUKE 
That’s not how it works. 
   VICKY 
Aha! 
   LUKE 
It’s flirtation. 
   VICKY 
It’s offensive. 
  LUKE 
Negging disarms the target- 
   VICKY 
What am I, a WMD? 
   LUKE 
Let me explain- 
   VICKY 
You went to one of those seminars. 
   LUKE 
Did not. 
   VICKY 
Shelled out a couple of grand to spend two days in a Holiday Inn Express learning the Art of Seduction from some guy named Xenith or Dagger or Lothario. 
   LUKE (sheepish) 
It was a Howard Johnson. 
   VICKY 
Even better. 
   LUKE 
It was supposed to make you laugh. 
   VICKY 
It didn’t. 
   LUKE 
Apollo said it would catch you off-guard, pique your curiosity. 
   VICKY 
Apollo? You should demand a refund.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Women in the Age of Trump: MEDUSA

MEDUSA by William K Hugel is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

WILLIAM K. HUGEL is a NYC based playwright whose ten minute play MEDUSA was first presented as part of the Dream Up Festival at Theater for the New City (Crystal Field, Artistic Director) and will be featured in Between Us Productions' Take Ten Festival this April. He is dedicating this performance to Donald Trump and anyone else that thinks they can stop the inevitable rise of the Powerful Woman. www.williamhugel.com

Thanks to William K. Hugel for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from his play MEDUSA.

   MEDUSA

Now don't start with that craziness again!

   (ELIZA smiles)

I'm warning you!

(MEDUSA becomes nervous and reaches for her book. ELIZA approaches her.)

Don't touch me!

   ELIZA

She's making me strong, Mother.

(ELIZA strokes MEDUSA'S head, as if she were the plant. MEDUSA tries to reach for the book but is paralyzed, half frozen.)

   MEDUSA

Eliza, don't!

   ELIZA

(Putting her hand on MEDUSA's stomach.)

Don't you remember, Mother, when they cut out your liver and your spleen? Don't you remember, Mother, when you were a queen?

   MEDUSA

   (As ELIZA lets go of her, tearfully)

It's too much! I don't want to hear about it!

   ELIZA

Why do you think father left?

   (She circles the stage, looking out at the audience.)

Why do you think all the men are leaving? Because they're afraid. Afraid of Her. In Africa they slash at Her bold clitoris. In India they defile Her in the streets. They are terrified of Her.

   (Approaches the plant)

Look how She's growing! They can't stop Her! She's rank with lust! Remember when you were rank with lust, Mother Rank and powerful?

(MEDUSA smiles faintly as ELIZA approaches her. This time when ELIZA strokes her her strength spreads to MEDUSA, who begins to move rhythmically in her chair.)

What they did to Her in Europe, that was most insidious. They changed Her language, so we couldn't recognize Her anymore. They piled bricks over your grave, Mother. They invented abstractions and they buried you. And they built on top a world they thought they could control. But the earth is shaking now Mother, it's trembling with Her lust, the bricks are beginning to fall! Don't you feel the earth, Mother, undulating through your liver and your spleen? Don't you remember, Mother, when you were a queen?

(ELIZA pulls off MEDUSA's hat, revealing a mass of wild hair. As MEDUSA stands ELIZA strips off her dress. Underneath MEDUSA is wearing garments made of animal hides, bone, etc. MEDUSA moves and stands center, proud and strong. ELIZA circles the outer stage addressing the audience.)

Prehistorical? Yes. All we have are myths and stories. Oh, that's right, you can't prove it. Nothing was written down, you say? Men write things down: This was before men ruled the world. The question is, can you feel it? Can you feel it in your liver and your spleen, that you too, once were a queen?

Women in the Age of Trump: NEW ACTS FOR OLD LESBIANS

NEW ACTS FOR OLD LESBIANS by Carol Weliky is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

CAROL WELIKY's stories and poetry have appeared, variously, on large magnets around Brooklyn, New York, stamped in concrete at a Portland, Oregon transit station, in several small press journals, and in the anthology “What Does It Mean to Be White in America,” in which she explores intersections of white and Jewish identity. “New Acts for Old Lesbians” is her first play.

Thanks to Carol Weliky for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from her play NEW ACTS FOR OLD LESBIANS.

   KATE
   (louder) 
Jayyy-Touffffe! 
   SANDRINE
   (laughing) 
That’s not stuffed. It means that you’re choked, suffocating. 
   KATE
Like Erica, remember last Thanksgiving, on that bone? That was one scary… 
   SANDRINE 
Like…mmm 
(searching for correct word) 
…asphyxié…asphyxiated! Smothered. 
   KATE
By any name. I had to marry a French teacher. 
   SANDRINE 
Stifled?
    ( Comes back over to KATE and plants kiss on her forehead.)  
And yes, one of the many benefits of being married to you, mon amour, has been getting to stay in the country, and actually have a teaching job… Muffled? Suppressed! Not that I didn’t love waitressing. That’s it – choking, suffocated, suppressed. 
   (Walks back to kitchen.)
   KATE 
Just fat as shit. That’s all I’m trying to say. 
   SANDRINE 
You’re 115 pounds with your clothes on, Katie – you need a fat layer. Christmas in Montreal, man. (remembering) Growing up I had a Kanuk, fur-trimmed, oh mon dieu! That thing was impenetrable, and you’d still be cold, come February. Of course, you couldn’t play hockey so
well in it, so jackets ended up flung off, warming the snow. No substitute for a good constitution
and a bit of blubber. 
   KATE 
I’m well on my way then. 
   SANDRINE 
With boots! 
   (Comes back into living room, with two glasses, and stops in front of KATE.) 
Kate, I’m sorry, but we have to talk about life after Christmas week, the eighth day – 
   (SANDRINE sets glasses down on table but continues standing.) 
I can’t live like this, without a plan.
   KATE 
We’ve been planning all year for it. Christmas vacation. We go, we come back. 
   SANDRINE 
And if I can’t come back! 
   KATE 
Then I buy boots. It’s not going to happen! 
   SANDRINE 
But if it does? You’re two minutes from Medicare and full pension, Kate – you can’t give those up. For me, for anything. 
   KATE 
You’ve said a dozen times you can still get a job in Montreal. Enough to support the two of us.
If we had to stay! Big if!

   SANDRINE 
Your home is here, Katie! You can’t just leave a lifetime, flat. 
   KATE 
My home is with you. 
   SANDRINE 
That was what marriage meant. And we hope will still mean: here, in our house, in our normalcy. But what seems normal lately, Katie? How long can we coast on not likelys and ifs? 
   KATE 
So, okay! IF something happens – 
   SANDRINE 
That’s right – 
   KATE 
You can’t stay! 
   SANDRINE 
You can’t go! 
   KATE 
It won’t happen!

Women in the Age of Trump: SWITCHING SIDES

SWITCHING SIDES by Gabriel Davis is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

GABRIEL DAVIS, MFA in Dramatic Writing, Carnegie Mellon School of Drama, Shubert Fellow. Published in "105 Five-Minute Plays for Study and Performance" (Smith and Kraus), "222 More Comedy Monologues" (Smith and Kraus), "Audition Monologues for Young Women" (Meriwether Publishing), “Best Contemporary Monologues For Kids Ages 7-15” (Applause Books). Read Gabriel's monologues at: MonologueGenie.com

Thanks to Gabriel Davis for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from his monologue SWITCHING SIDES.
He wants me to cut my hair -to lose ten pounds. Last night, we’re making love -first off, he calls it “rumping” -we’re -after we’re through -he’s always so sweet after- playing with my -running his hand down my stomach. But last night he grabs a love handle and says “that’s super meaty”. Now what the hell is that supposed to mean?! I mean that’s a hint, right? So like I didn’t know how to take that kind of -I mean who says that, “super meaty” -I’m a woman, not some Dinty More Beef Stew. I fall asleep, don’t say anything to him about it, just smile and pass out -what a wuss, right? So I have this messed up dream -I’m in a fashion show, right -Brandon is a talent scout, but he’s not my boyfriend in the dream. And he looks at me and says “Oh yeah girl you’ve got real potential.” All these guys in white coats strap me to a chair and suck like thirty pounds of fat out of me through some tubes, and these little umpa lumpas are spreading it on bread, and Santa Claus is there taking it to little chil- anyway Brandon is like sculpting me. Giving all these orders, right, like “lose the upper body, enlarge the breasts, tighten up and round out the ass, fill out the legs, lose the face.” 
So there I am. I get out of the chair and look at myself in the mirror. I’m just a pair of legs, an ass, and two humungus breasts. Brandon looks at me and says “perfect, she looks super meaty” and I’m really confused, I mean genuinely confused, I mean crap, where’s my head, and I start screaming “where’s my head” “what did you do with my head” “HAS ANYONE SEEN MY GODAMNED HEAD!” And I wake up screaming “Head!” so loud that Brandon thinks I’m asking him a question and he says “Sure, I’m always down for some late night head.” I mean, what is that, right? 
And later when I ask him if he thinks, you know, if I’m beautiful, he says; “why don’t you dye your hair like that chick Kate Upton, I bet you’d look real sexy.” So maybe you can understand why I think men are pigs. Cause I mean who says that shit! None of my friends of the non-male persuasion would say that word, “Super Meaty” -what am I a hot dog.

Women in the Age of Trump: THE TOWER

THE TOWER by Diana Burbano is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

DIANA BURBANO is a Colombian immigrant, an actor, and a playwright. Works: Fabulous Monsters, a Festival51 winner, Picture Me Rollin’, Silueta, with Tom and Chris Shelton. Libertadoras, Policarpa and Linda for the 365 Women a Year project. Caliban’s Island is published by YouthPLAYS. dianaburbano.com
http://www.breathoffire.org/2015-10-week-summer-playwrighting-series/current-workshops/

Thanks to Diana Burbano for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from her play THE TOWER.

   LANI
     (This is a big thing:)

Um... I thought it was amazing when you wore the pussy bow blouse on TV. That was-- I mean-- That was genius.

   MRS

   (Looks blank and impassive.)

Mmmm. (A pause.) I was born in a communist country, you know? I lived in a hell made of cinder blocks as a child. This..

   (She gestures)

This was a dream.

   LANI

Oh, for me too! I never dreamed I would ever work in a place like this. I was raised in...

   MRS

Hillary and Bill came to my wedding.

   LANI

Oh.

   MRS

I love it here. Surrounded by gold, protected.

   LANI

   (Blurts out)

Like Rapunzel. or Rasputin!

   MRS

I’m a happy bird.

   LANI

Ok. I should go Mrs...

   MRS

You American women think you are so, how you say, "enlightened." Up by your bootstraps, that silly phrase, what is it supposed to mean?

   LANI

To pull yourself out of...

   MRS

Yes, yes, but literally, where does it come from?

   LANI

I... I’m not sure. I could Google it.

   MRS

Don’t bother. Do you like being a tutor?

   LANI

It’s a good job.

   MRS

So you don’t like it.

   LANI

I’m doing it to put myself through college.

   MRS

Why?

   LANI

Why-- what?

   MRS

Never mind, Lani, my stylist picked that blouse. We had her fired.

   LANI

Oh.

   MRS

Please go now.

   LANI

Yes, Ma’am. (Turns to go.) Ma’am. My family came to this country as immigrants too. From Mexico. I was born there.

   MRS

You look white.

   LANI

My dad and mom love this country.

   MRS

Mmmm.

   LANI

You’re in a position to do so much...

   MRS

Being made fun of by liberal comedians? They mock the way I speak. My accent. I thought that wasn’t politically correct.

   LANI

That’s, that’s awful, truly.

   MRS

I want to be left in peace. Why would I want to serve America? This open, uncensored "culture" You all think you can say anything to anybody. It’s shameful.

   LANI

You’re an American.

   MRS

Yes, well... Not everything was bad about communism.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Women in the Age of Trump: IF SHE WERE NOT MY DAUGHTER I'D JUST GRAB HER

IF SHE WERE NOT MY DAUGHTER - I'D JUST GRAB HER by Paul K. Smith is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

Thanks to Paul K. Smith for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from his play.




   RAMÓN

Would be no problem at all -Would be so easy to just blow your head off. Women die every day.

   (RAMÓN exits).

   MEL-ANYA

So do men. . .

   NICK

   (Not seeming to notice Ramón’s parting words: )

(Does) Adolfo ever stay put?

   (Mel-anya shakes her head in disbelief.)

He doesn’t? You know, when I first came here -- found you’d married Adolfo Drumpf -- I was dumpfounded. I would never have pictured you, and him, together.

   (= Instead of you and me.)

   MEL-ANYA

Nor I, mon ami. Never, ever, ever.

   NICK

   (He looks at her closely, then:)

Mel-anya-- You may not want to stay here for this. Ramón -- Ramon!!!!!!!!

   (MEL-ANYA scurries out, exchanging looks with RAMÓN as he enters: her look says, ‘See, my avenger is standing up for me.’ A look that does not faze Ramón one whit.).

Ramón, where are you going? Get back here.

   RAMÓN

Mr. Drumpf wanted me to go with him—

   NICK

Not so fast. You think what you’re doing makes the grade? I don’t think so.

   RAMÓN

Oh what do I got to do?

NICK

You’re still an apprentice for this job. Don’t forget that. Lazaro! would you come over here?

   (An old gardener pads over, very leery.)

   NICK

At ease, Gomez. Ramón, this is Lazaro. Lazaro Gomez. Now Ramón, you keep this secret-- okay? You are not a Drumpf employee till until you pass “o peira” – until you pass the test. The test of a man. Well, guess what we have here? our gardener --Show Ramón your tools-- our gardener Lazaro is in the country without papers.

   RAMÓN

You mean he’s an illegal? Well, Mr. Drumpf hates illegals. They are like germs. We’re not safe from their impur-i-ties. From their contagion.

   NICK

And with germs -- we need germ warfare.

   (Nick puts a fat revolver in Ramón’s hand.)

Put yours away. This one’s clean. You understand the job, Ramón?

   RAMÓN

Yessir. No problemo.

   NICK

You know what needs to be done here. Ethnic cleansing. If you sincerely want to be hired.

   (NICK exits. RAMÓN checks the sights on the gun by firing it. Lazaro Gomez falls to the dirt, dead, still holding a gardening tool. The shot is a siren call to DRUMPF. He stalks in, sees Lazaro Gomez the gardener is dead. And sees Ramón holding the smoking gun. Takes command. NICK enters, deflects Drumpf’s fury from himself to Ramón. )

DRUMPF

My God what have you done!!? I said, take him out. Not, kill him: deport him.

Women in the Age of Trump: MY EYES ARE UP HERE

MY EYES ARE UP HERE by Les Abromovitz is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

LES ABROMOVITZ, an attorney, is the author, co-author, and ghostwriter of many business books. He has won two playwriting contests, and his plays have been included in a number of festivals. His website is www.LesAbromovitz.com.
Thanks to Les Abromovitz for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from his play MY EYES ARE UP HERE.

   JUNE

It’s bad enough he’s useless, toxic, and sexist. He’s incompetent.

   APRIL

What was his father like?

   JUNE

His dad was always a perfect gentleman who loved his wife. Even when I was in my prime, he treated me and the other women here with respect.

   APRIL

Where did he go wrong with Martin?

   JUNE

I guess the apple does fall pretty far from the tree. You’re young. Why don’t you find another job?

   APRIL

   (Shakes her head in disgust)
 
Where have I heard that before? So that’s my choice. Put up with a creepy boss or leave. I like this job and what I do.

   JUNE

I’ve always said: It’s never the job that causes problems. It’s the people.

   APRIL

The people are the job. I haven’t been in the work force as long as you, June, but I don’t know of many jobs where you get to do your thing without dealing with bosses and co-workers.

   JUNE

Are you referring to me?

   APRIL

You and I get along great. I’m just saying it’s rare to find a work situation where you love your boss and every one of your co-workers.

   JUNE

Before Martin came along, we were like family – and not a dysfunctional one. If you had a legitimate beef, Martin’s father would try to resolve the issue.

   APRIL

And now, there’s no one to complain to here. For two years, we had to listen to Howard Stern interview strippers, because Fred in purchasing didn’t own a set of earphones. If you hadn’t bought him an expensive pair of ear buds, we’d still be forced to listen.

   JUNE

My son tells me I should open my own business if I want to succeed or fail based on my own merits.

APRIL
 
What does your daughter say?

   JUNE

Her aunt and I have made her as cynical as we are. When my older sister was one of the first female engineers at her company forty years ago, they used to tell her that the glass ceiling would be shattered in ten years. They still don’t have a woman running a division.

   APRIL

Don’t hold your breath for Martin to promote any women around here. Just his golf buddies.

   JUNE

If you think the men around here are bad, try working with engineers. The majority of them have the social skills of twelve-year old boys. The only social interaction they get is playing video games online. And even in that world, they don’t know how to interact with the women players.

   APRIL

Most of the guys here are OK – except for Martin and Fred.

   JUNE

Maybe they’ll change if they ever have a daughter. On the bright side, my sister deals with customers who won’t even shake her hand because of their religion or culture. 

Women in the Age of Trump: PENICILLIN, CREEP

PENICILLIN, CREEP by Deborah Yarchun is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

DEBORAH YARCHUN is a two time Jerome Fellowship recipient and a graduate of the Iowa Playwrights Workshop where she was an Iowa Arts Fellow. Deborah’s plays include Tectonic Melange, The Aleph Complex, and The Man in the Sukkah. She was the spring 2016 Dorit & Gerald Paul Artist in Residence at Indiana University. DeborahYarchun.com.

Thanks to Deborah Yarchun for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from her play PENICILLIN, CREEP.

   KATE

And I mean- look at this.

   (She shows him a screenshot on her phone.)

   JOE

Oh, yeah- definitely looks like a rapist. He’s got kind of a Norman Bates thing going, Slicked back hair. Who still slicks back their hair?

   KATE

Right? And it’s an awesome autumn night. The first autumn night you can smell the leaves. And we’re drinking—

   JOE

Penicillins.

   (A moment as they acknowledge their drinks.)

   KATE

And we want to keep talking. So he’s like – “Let’s get another.” And after I’m all: “Water?” And he comes back with water and two more drinks. “It’s on the bartender.”

   JOE

Right.

   KATE

He tipped them a $20 at the top of the night. He was a CEO. Is a CEO.

   JOE

I’m a doctor.

(The following comes out quickly.)

   KATE

Got it. He was in investment sales. And I tell him, he should change his profile. It said “Handsome, racy, and fun.” Which I tell him could read as a red flag. I tell him to change it to “Investment sales, invested in you.” And he’s listening to me.

   JOE

   (Listening intently.)

Uh-huh.

   KATE

And toasting us, “To new beginnings.” “To new beginnings.” I don’t buy it, but I like his confidence. And the conversation’s going as smoothly as the drink. And even though all night – I’m very insistent he sit across from me, not next to me. Somehow he’s in the seat next to me. And even though I told him in advance of the date – this date ends with a kiss on the cheek, he’s making out with me. And I’m pretty sure touching me here – and here- and I’m gone. Next thing I know we’re on the street and he says he’ll cab me home to make sure I get there safe – and we’re at my place now- and he’s like – and it’s the perfect Autumn night. You can smell the leaves. And he’s – “Can I use your bathroom?” And I’m sloshed – and care about him at this point – because we did- we hit it off. Shared intensity, work ethic. And having to pee is the worse, right? I have a small bladder- I would know.

   JOE

Yeah.

   KATE

So I figure –sure. But then he’s in my room. And we’re making out again. And he asks to spend the night. And I say no – but he says we’ll just cuddle. And like my tank of physical affection is on empty. I’m barely running on fumes.

   JOE

Of course.

   KATE

“Just cuddling.” “We’re just cuddling.” And I’m very clear. You can’t touch me here. And you can’t touch me here. Even though maybe in the cab, he already has. And I’m asleep. And it’s 4 am, and his hand is in my pajama bottoms and his finger is – well, you know. It’s funny because like of all the times – for somebody to grab you by the pussy. I should have known earlier in the night when he said he was undecided. Of all the times to have a guy do that.

“And he’s like “Is this good?” “IS this good?” And I’m half-awake now realizing what’s happening and can barely get out “No. No it’s not. No. What?” “I’m sorry, it’s my animal side.” “Get out- You have to go- you can’t be here.” “You’re going to send me out at this hour to take a cab?” “TAKE AN UBER.” So he ubers. To his credit- he doesn’t stick around. “Eleven minutes.” He’s standing there. I’m sitting. Waiting for this uber. This crazy, tense eleven minutes. Nine minutes in. “You must feel so violated,” he says. He’s counting. Six minutes. Five minutes. Four minutes. Two minutes. And at two minutes- he remembers something- he reaches onto the bed – and he finds a condom he stashed. “Better safe, you know- he says – just in case.” And he’s gone. Twenty minutes later I get this text: “Got home safe. Sorry if I overstepped. I had a really nice time.” And later that day: “Can I see you again?” I wrote him:

(She pulls out her phone. He takes it.)   
 
   JOE

   (Reading.)

“Just to be clear- so you understand: what happened last night was not okay.”

   JOE & KATE (She knows it by heart)

“It was sexual assault.”

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Women in the Age of Trump: THE FLUIDITY OF TRUTH

THE FLUIDITY OF TRUTH by Matthew Weaver is a semi-finalist for NYCPlaywrights project "Women in the Age of Trump."

MATTHEW WEAVER is a Spokane, Wash. playwright. His writing has been performed in Washington State, Canada, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Ohio, Texas and West Virginia.
https://newplayexchange.org/users/9069/matthew-weaver
BED RIDE production: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvFLNvQZMGk GLUTTONY AND LUST ARE FRIENDS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BygMxGrpBUA

Thanks to Matthew Weaver for allowing NYCPlaywrights to publish this excerpt from his play THE FLUIDITY OF TRUTH.

   GINA
And I’m complaining. I’m pressing charges. 
   POLICE OFFICER 
Really? Still? After all that? 
   GINA 
Yes, really. How would you like it if somebody grabbed your chest and said “Honka honka”? 
   (GINA grabs the POLICE OFFICER’s chest.) 
   POLICE OFFICER 
   (scary intense) 
Ma’am! 
   DONNIE 
Hey now! 
   POLICE OFFICER 
Back up, ma’am. That’s assault. 
   GINA 
I know it is. I was just showing you - 
   POLICE OFFICER 
Get down on the ground. Get down on the ground. Get down on the ground. All units, all units, requesting backup. Woman in (describes GINA’s outfit) assaulting police officer. Woman assaulting police officer. 
   DONNIE 
Terrible. Just terrible. 
   GINA 
You - 
   (GINA lunges at DONNIE. The POLICE OFFICER grabs her, forces her to the ground.) 
   POLICE OFFICER 
You saw that, right? 
   DONNIE 
Saw the whole thing, with my own two eyes. 
   POLICE OFFICER 
   (to audience) 
You all saw that, right? 
   DONNIE 
Better frisk her, officer. 
   GINA 
Keep your goddamn hands off me. 
   DONNIE 
Very cranky. I think she’s probably unstable.

   (The POLICE OFFICER cuffs GINA.) 
   POLICE OFFICER 
You have the right to remain silent. You have the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, then one will be provided to you ... 
   (The POLICE OFFICER forces GINA up.) 

   GINA 
Please. This isn’t - this isn’t right. 
   (POLICE OFFICER hauls GINA away. As they exit ...) 
   DONNIE 
Lock her up! Lock her up! Lock her up!

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